Ena’s to showcase unique Elei and handicraft in Auckland

Apia-based Ena’s Elei and Handicrafts will be bringing along its latest editions of garments and handicrafts for display and sale at the Pacific Trade Invest (PTI) NZ Path to the Pacific Trade Show in Auckland on Saturday 6 April. Owned by Ena and Louis Schwalger, Ena’s specialises in traditional Samoan dresses, casual and formal fashions for traditional and everyday use, Aloha shirts adorned in Samoan motifs and floral art.

Ena’s also sells a selection of carved wood products for traditional Samoan use and other wood ornaments for sales to tourists and the local market. They would like to use Samoan arts and labour to help eliminate poverty.

“Ena and I are very pleased to be participating and looking forward to the event,” Louis Schwalger told Pacific Periscope speaking from the Samoan capital Apia.

“We will be showcasing our wood carvings with a variety of new designs. Our new products are dresses made from stretched materials with new Elei patterns,” he added.

Mrs Schwalger attended a PTI Path to Market workshop in Samoa and as a result was identified as a potential exporter and invited to attend this year’s Pasifika Business Market as part of the Path to Market Programme at Pasifika Festival.

Ena’s has attended a Path to Market workshop previously and has been selected to participate in the one-day PTI NZ Path to the Pacific Trade Show at The Cloud on Auckland’s waterfront on 6 April.

Mr Schwalger says they are looking to grow Ena’s business in New Zealand. “We hope to sell what products we bring to the show and also find some New Zealand distributors,” he said.

Ena’s sees potential in social media promotion for their products. “We are setting up a new Facebook page “Ena’s Elei” and we will be posting our various products and events [on it],” Mr Schwalger said.

Earlier, in an interview with Coconet TV at the Pacific Festival in Guam in 2016, Mrs Schwalger said she also prints the fabrics herself making her Elei’s fabrics totally unique. Pure cotton is used for their hand printed lavalava because the fabric was softer, she said.

Their stall in the Savalalo Market in Apia was destroyed when the entire market was burnt down in early 2016.

For more information email PTI NZ Trade Development manager Ian Furlong at ian.f@pacifictradeinvest.co.nz

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